Bust Stress During Pregnancy

Stress can adversely affect adults, and it can negatively affect babies and children as well.

Stress can adversely affect adults, and it can negatively affect babies and children as well. Research has linked stress, anxiety, and low self-esteem in pregnant women with an increased risk of stillbirth and with stunting a child’s intelligence. Children from stressed pregnancies are also more likely to be hyperactive, have emotional and social issues, as well as suffer from stress themselves.

Here are six easy and quick ways to keep stress away while you are carrying.

Laugh

Keep joke books handy or watch funny videos online. Not only does it serve as a distraction, laughing relaxes you, helps you breathe, and resets your mood.

Visiting Hours

Let friends and family visit you, help you with chores, and talk to you. Building a support network to socialize, share, laugh with, and receive help from can reduce your stress during pregnancy and after.

Exercise

Walking is the safest exercise choice during pregnancy. Whether it’s around the house, on a treadmill, or in the neighbourhood, walking helps energize you and reduces stress. Avoid walking at night though as it can interfere with your night time sleep cycle.

Drink Water

It’s easy to forget to drink water as you’re already feeling so full. Drinking water will keep the body hydrated and eliminate toxins that can cause stress. Pregnant women need to drink a minimum of eight glasses of water a day.

Power Naps

Pregnant women have higher energy requirements. A 30 to 60 minute nap during the day will allow your body to relax and unwind. If you have trouble sleeping, simply lay down to rest and use this time to listen to soothing music.

Pedi Soaks

Your feet may swell and feel sore as you carry the weight of the little life inside you. It would relax you immensely if you could sit in a comfortable position and soak your feet in warm water once a day for 30 minutes.

Women who take good care of themselves during pregnancy deliver babies who grow up to be happier, more positive, and more likely to make healthy choices for themselves.